Tag Archives: non-fiction

Rapid Reviews: what we’ve been reading

  •  Here Lies Arthur, By Philip Reeve
    A new way to look at the classic tale of King Arthur, this time through the eyes of Gwynna, a young girl rescued by the master storyteller himself, Myrrdin.
  •  Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling
    You might know Mindy from her role in The Office, but she wears a lot of other hats as well – comedy writer, off- Broadway performer, playwright. This book is part memoir, part essay, and all fun!
  • The Lacemaker and the Princess, by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley Set in the time of the French revolution, Bradley writes with a wonderful voice for both the time period and the social status of her protagonist… a young lacemaker named Isabelle who becomes the unlikely friend of a princess.
  • Building the Great Cathedrals, by Francois Icher
    Ever wondered how our medieval ancestors built such soaring, intricate structures? In a blend of illustrations, photographs, and text, this book will show you the process all the way from the job of the most skilled architect to the lowliest stone-cutter.

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Book Review: Harry Truman’s Excellent Adventure

Harry Truman’s Excellent Adventure

by Matthew Algeo

Adult Non-fiction

I bet you didn’t know this about Harry Truman: In 1953, after the end of his presidency,  he and  his wife Bess  took a road trip. No entourage, no secret service, no press – just a former president and his wife in a shiny new Chrysler, with 2,500 miles of road to cover.

During their three week roadtrip, they visited friends, celebrated their wedding anniversary, went to a Broadway play, ate at roadside diners … everything that an average couple in the 1950s might do. What they didn’t count on was the attention. Clifton Truman Daniel, President Truman’s grandson, said, “The thing that always amazed me was that my grandfather, having run the country, thought he could just get in his car and drive across it.”

In this engaging history, the author retraces the Truman’s footsteps, gathering anecdotes and memories along the way. It was picked as one of the Washington Post’s “Best Books of the Year” and after reading it, I can see why.

 

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Book Review: Twelve Little Cakes

Twelve Little Cakes

by Dominika Dery

Adult Nonfiction

Dominika Dery has a surprisingly charming way of writing about the difficult subject of growing up in communist Czechoslovakia. Life wasn’t easy under the oppressive government  – especially if your parents were dissidents – but each tale of Dery’s childhood is presented with such love and humor that her book escapes the gloom and despair of other books about the time period.

From her father’s misadventures in construction to her debut with the Czech ballet, Dery provides a unique view of life behind the Iron Curtain.

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Book Review: My Year With Eleanor

My Year With Eleanor

by Noelle Hancock

Adult Non-fiction

When entertainment blogger Noelle Hancock was abruptly laid off, she had to face her fears in a very real way. She quickly realized that she’d traded in her confidence for anxiety and her ambition for passiveness. Then a quote chalked on a blackboard in a coffee shop changed everything:

“Do one thing every day that scares you.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

With the help of her boyfriend and a few close friends (real friends are the ones who will go skydiving with you!) Noelle embarks on a project: a vow to do at least one thing that scares her every day for a year.

Weaving in plenty of facts about Eleanor’s life and a lot of inspiration, Noelle faces her fears, including those of flying, falling, karaoke, and stand up comedy. Along the way she finds her fearless self again, even finding that she enjoys some of the things she feared most.

Luckily for her readers, it’s a ride that’s easy to enjoy – and definitely not a book to be afraid of!

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Rapid Reviews: new adult non-fiction

Five of our newest adult non-fiction titles:

  • Your Brain At Work, by David Rock:  Have you ever wondered about how our brains process and analyze information? This book shows you how to understand your brain and use that knowlege to work smarter and better, not harder.
  • The Dead Beat: Lost Souls, Lucky Stiffs, and the Perverse Pleasures of Obituaries, by Marilyn Johnson: Ms. Johnson has a gift for making a specialized subject interesting to a wide audience. She discusses her favorite obituaries and obituary writers, old and new, sharing plenty of excerpts along the way.
  • Knuckler, by Tim Wakefield with Tony Massarotti:  Although as the title suggests, this book is about how Red Sox pitcher Tim Wakefield learned to pitch a perfect knuckleball, it’s also about a lot more than that – like how he went from being a young Florida boy who had a hard time getting on any team to a hardworking baseball player and all-around nice guy.
  • Feed Your Face: Younger, Smoother Skin and a Beautiful Body in 28 Delicious Days, by Jessica Wu, M.D.: Become beautiful from the inside out! What you put into your body is every bit as important as what you put onto it. Here you’ll find testimonals, menu plans, before-and-after photos, and realistic, practical advice on using what you eat to help you look your best.
  • Fallin’ Up: My Story, by Taboo: from the streets of LA to the biggest concert stages in the world, Taboo, founding member of the Black Eyed Peas, has an honest and inspiring story to tell.

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Book Review: The Wilder Life

The Wilder Life
 by Wendy McClure

Adult Non-Fiction

Like many children, Wendy McClure grew up reading Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books. But unlike many of those children, her interest in the world of Laura never really went away, and as an adult she found herself revisiting the books with new interest. It started small: she ground her own wheat berries to make bread like they did in The Long Winter. She learned to churn butter. She started a Twitter account called @halfpintingalls. But before long she was visiting historical sites relating to the series, ranging from Pepin, Wisconson to Springfield, Missouri – at least seven in all.

With equal parts humor and introspection, The Wilder Life explores the uneasy relationship between the real Ingalls family history, the book series, and the television show … and why we still are enchanted by the Ingalls family after all of these years.

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Book Review: Digital Photography: Top 100 Simplified Tips & Tricks

 Digital Photography Simplified: Top 100 Tips and Tricks
by Rob Sheppard

Adult non-fiction

Photography isn’t just for professionals! And with the information in this book, you’ll be taking amazing shots in no time. It is part of the Visual Learning System, and the motto “Read Less – Learn More” is certainly accurate. Each photography tip is well illustrated with multiple examples and the minimal text is clear and easy to understand. Great for visual learners! You’ll learn how to compose  shots, take advantage of natural light and understand f-stops, as well as many other tips for shooting, editing, printing, organizing and archiving digital photos.

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